The Bridgestone Super Bowl XLVI Halftime Show is over. Or is it?

Prior to the halftime show, which starred Madonna, every mention I heard of the show included Bridgestone's name. Admittedly, the mentions were on National Football League game telecasts on NBC (the National Broadcasting Co.), the television host of the Super Bowl this year.

Since the end of the game, however, I haven't heard Bridgestone's name at all. When halftime is brought up, the press, at best, calls it the Super Bowl Halftime Show.

Even the Bridgestone technology-themed commercials are not receiving any love (unlike last year). Ace Metrix Inc. scored "Performance Basketball" 19th out of the top 50 commercials shown during Super Bowl XLVI (46 for you non-Romans). "Performance Football," which featured NFL hall of famers Troy Aikman and Deion Sanders, placed 33rd.

I checked out how others ranked the ads, including bloggers, and found the same pattern: little, if any, mention of Bridgestone. Marketing firm Innis Maggiore Group Inc., based in Canton, Ohio, ranked the top five and bottom five ads based on three criteria: entertainment value, likeability and effectiveness.

Neither Bridgestone ad finished in the top five -- or the bottom five.

And that brings me back to the halftime show discussion and this question: Is bad publicity better than no publicity? Being ranked at the bottom of a list still gets your name out there.

But this year, British singer M.I.A. flipped off the world during her bit in Madonna's performance. That has received a lot of publicity.

"Super Bowl's Big TV Score," wrote the "Wall Street Journal" on the Tuesday following the game. "Viewship Hits Record 111.3 million, but Singer's Gesture Dulls NBC's Good News."

And throughout the story, there was no mention of Bridgestone.

Is this good or bad for Bridgestone Americas Inc., which spent millions of dollars partnering with the NFL and the Super Bowl?

Author

Bob Ulrich
Bob Ulrich

Editor, Retired

Editor Bob Ulrich has earned a reputation as an industry expert thanks to his insightful, in-depth articles and blogs on the tire industry. Before joining Modern Tire Dealer in 1985, Bob earned a B.A. in English literature from Ohio Northern University. Also, he graduated from the University of Akron School of Law with a J.D.

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Editor Bob Ulrich has earned a reputation as an industry expert thanks to his insightful, in-depth articles and blogs on the tire industry. Before joining Modern Tire Dealer in 1985, Bob earned a B.A. in English literature from Ohio Northern University. Also, he graduated from the University of Akron School of Law with a J.D.

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