Sometimes it seems like you can't rationally discuss gun control with anyone. It joins religion and politics as a taboo topic because it brings out the hate in people.

It shouldn't, but it does. Proponents and opponents of gun control are partially responsible. "They don't openly respect each other's views; why should I respect yours?" is the rationale

That is a lemming mentality.

But there are solid reasons why gun control is necessary. And unnecessary. Personally, I believe in the Second Amendment. I also believe in compromise, and see a lot of room for discussion.

I don't like to overreact. In August of 2011, a neighbor (crazy or evil, you choose) killed seven people in my neighborhood in Copley Township, Ohio. Five were killed on Goodenough Ave., two on Schocalog Rd. -- three if you count the killer, who eventually was taken out by a police officer.

My wife and I live on the corner of Goodenough and Schocalog. We talked with one of the victims the morning of the killing while we were walking our dogs. Another victim, a kid, ran through our front yard trying to get away.

As horrific as that scenario sounds, my first thoughts weren't to get rid of guns. Almost two years later, I'm not sure what could have been done to prevent what happened. Maybe nothing. But it sure is open to respectful debate.

I am sure, however, that you and other small business owners need to have your own gun control policy.

In a recent Web poll, in which we asked, "Do you allow your employees to bring guns into the workplace?" 30% said they did, 57% said they didn't, and 13% said "it hasn't come up."

In this day and age, with concealed weapon carry permits legal in many states, it is important to make sure your employees and customers know what they can and can't do once they enter your parking lot. Here is what I suggest:

1. Check to see what your state allows. If you are a multi-state dealer, multi-check.

2. Develop a gun control policy, perhaps even a "weapon" control policy.

3. Consult an attorney, if necessary.

4. Put the policy in writing.

5. Enforce your policy.

For more specifics on the issues that you need to consider when crafting such a policy, check out this link:

"Policy control: Do you allow employees to bring guns to work?"

What are your thoughts about gun control in general and/or a gun control policy for your business in particular? Let us know what you think by leaving a comment.

Author

Bob Ulrich
Bob Ulrich

Editor, Retired

Editor Bob Ulrich has earned a reputation as an industry expert thanks to his insightful, in-depth articles and blogs on the tire industry. Before joining Modern Tire Dealer in 1985, Bob earned a B.A. in English literature from Ohio Northern University. Also, he graduated from the University of Akron School of Law with a J.D.

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Editor Bob Ulrich has earned a reputation as an industry expert thanks to his insightful, in-depth articles and blogs on the tire industry. Before joining Modern Tire Dealer in 1985, Bob earned a B.A. in English literature from Ohio Northern University. Also, he graduated from the University of Akron School of Law with a J.D.

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