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Trump Threatens Tariff Increase on China — Including Tires

Joy Kopcha
Posted on May 6, 2019

President Donald Trump has once again threatened to increase tariffs on Chinese products imported into the U.S., and the Auto Care Association has repeated its plea that Trump change course.

In a Tweet on May 5, Trump said he would increase a 10% tariff on products — which includes tires — to 25% on Friday (May 10, 2019.)

In a statement, the Auto Care Association says it supports the president’s effort to address China’s unfair trade practices, “and is encouraged by recent progress made through trade talks,” but the association is opposed to “the use of tariffs as a negotiating strategy. U.S. companies and consumers end up bearing the brunt of these taxes on imported product through disrupted supply chains, increased prices and job losses.

“The Auto Care Association urges President Trump not to follow through on his threat to increase tariffs on $200 billion in imported goods from China as soon as this week. The proposed sudden increase from 10% to 25% would have an immediate negative impact on not only the U.S. businesses that manufacture and distribute these parts, but the motoring public who will see higher prices on a wide range of products, including important safety-related components.

“In 2018, China was the second largest source of auto parts imported into the U.S., second only to Mexico and totaling over $20.1 billion worth of product. Furthermore, the president’s suggestion that a 25% tariff could be levied on an additional $325 billion in imports from China, without knowing which goods would be impacted, creates even more uncertainty for the business community.”

Here's a look at MTD's July 2018 story when Trump initially imposed the 10% tariff on $200 billion worth of products — which included passenger tires, bus and truck tires, racing tires, motorcycle tires, bicycle tires, and off-the-road tires for applications in farm, forestry, construction, mining and handling equipment.

Related Topics: Chinese tariffs, Donald Trump, tariffs

Joy Kopcha Senior Editor & Digital Projects Editor
Comments ( 4 )
  • Glen Fletcher

     | about 10 months ago

    Tariffs in the short run will cause increased prices. But in the long game it will help US industries. Look what happened to the steel industry.

  • See all comments
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